Massachusetts Department of Public Health

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WBUR CommonHealth: Disabled residents face major health disparities according to UMass Medical School report

A new report from UMass Medical School’s Commonwealth Medicine division and the Department of Public Health highlights the ways Massachusetts residents with disabilities “fare worse” than those without disabilities when it comes to physical and mental health and quality medical care, according to a post on WBUR’s CommonHealth blog.

Expanded newborn screening offers early diagnosis, treatment of infants with SCID

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at UMass Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. Data from 11 newborn screening programs published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) showed the rate of SCID in newborns is higher than previously thought and believed to be 1 in 58,000.

First study of pregnant women with intellectual and developmental disabilities reveals mothers and babies have poorer health outcomes

The first population-based study of pregnant women with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States reveals that these mothers and their babies are at a greater risk of adverse outcomes that include preterm birth, low birth weight and low Apgar scores. The study was led by researchers at UMass Medical School, who were recently awarded a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to further investigate those disparities. 

UMass Medical School studying patterns of health care use among people with intellectual disabilities

Massachusetts is one of five states using Medicaid claims data to study how people with intellectual disabilities are using health care services. The study led by UMass Medical School aims to improve the health and well-being of this population and understand their health care patterns.

Media outlets report on heroic acts by New England Newborn Screening Program that saved baby's life

“Above and beyond the call of duty” doesn’t quite capture the heroic acts by New England Newborn Screening Program staff in the middle of a January blizzard, when they braved a snowbound state to collect blood samples from newborn babies that needed to be screened for early diagnosis for a range of rare disorders. The New England Newborn Screening Program is operated by UMass Medical School.
 

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