Pregnancy

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First study of pregnant women with intellectual and developmental disabilities reveals mothers and babies have poorer health outcomes

The first population-based study of pregnant women with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States reveals that these mothers and their babies are at a greater risk of adverse outcomes that include preterm birth, low birth weight and low Apgar scores. The study was led by researchers at UMass Medical School, who were recently awarded a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to further investigate those disparities. 

UMass Medical School study indicates Rhode Island women with disabilities have a higher risk of pregnancy complications and poor infant outcomes

A study of pregnant women with disabilities in Rhode Island led by UMass Medical School has found that these women are more likely to report medical complications during pregnancy, have preterm births and low birth weight babies. The researchers conclude that clinicians need to be aware of the increased risks of pregnancy complications and poor infant outcomes.

Study by UMass Medical School and Brandeis University highlights unmet needs, barriers to care for pregnant women with disabilities

A study initiated at UMass Medical School and led by Brandeis University highlights unmet needs and barriers to care for women with physical disabilities during pregnancy and childbirth, including clinicians’ knowledge and attitudes and accessibility to health care facilities and equipment. The researchers said clinicians need training to better care for pregnant women with physical disabilities.

Autism Speaks: UMass Medical School study finds high rates of pregnancy complications among those with developmental and intellectual disabilities

The first nationwide study of pregnant women with developmental and intellectual disabilities from UMass Medical School and Brandeis University has found high rates of complications including fetal death, preeclampsia and preterm birth, according to a Sept. 11 article published by Autism Speaks Science News. The study found that women with these disabilities fare worse than the general population and could benefit from additional education and intervention.